If You’re Using Verdana in Printed Documents, Stop Now!

You may not know, but certain fonts like Verdana and Georgia were designed for use on the screen, not print.

Verdana (a Sans Serif font) was released in 1996 as an easy-to-read screen face for the web. Verdana is a font that looks gorgeous at 11px on the screen, but because of its very open spacing, it’s cumbersome to read in print. Not to mention, Verdanda’s limited weights (regular, bold, italic) make it very limiting in design. (Fortunately, Microsoft and its typography partner Ascender Corporation are now working to create continuity between web and print fonts in print-compatible fonts like Verdana Pro and Georgia Pro.)

As a business person, you should know that fonts aren’t interchangeable. Print fonts are designed for easy reading on paper, and web fonts are designed to be easily read via a computer screen. Verdana also takes up about 19% more horizontal space than the typeface Arial. So a switch away from Verdana could reduce your paper costs by up to 19%.

If you’re thinking, “Can fonts really be that different?” here is the reason:

Aliased Type:
As you can see in the image to the left, the aliased letter has sharp, jagged edges. This makes the letter ideal for print because when zoomed out to 100%, the edges appear crisp and clean to the eye.
 

Anti-aliased Type:
Anti-aliasing on the other hand smoothes the jagged edge which makes it easier to read on-screen. As a general rule, any time we we bring a client’s logo or other type treatments on screen, we use anti-aliasing to correct its appearance.

If you want to find the perfect font that’s compatible with your project we have thousands of options and would be happy to guide you through the process.

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